Microsoft Security Bulletin for December Patches That Fix 39 Security Vulnerabilities

Microsoft Security Bulletin for December Patches That Fix 39 Security Vulnerabilities

December 29, 2018 | Mina Hao

Overview

The following table lists related product and vulnerabilityinformation (information in red indicates vulnerabilities of relatively highrisks).

Product
CVE ID
CVE Title
.NET Framework
CVE-2018-8517
.NET Framework Denial Of Service Vulnerability
.NET Framework
CVE-2018-8540
.NET Framework Remote Code Injection Vulnerability
Adobe Flash Player
ADV180031
December 2018 Adobe Flash Security Update
Internet Explorer
CVE-2018-8619
Microsoft Internet Explorer Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Internet Explorer
CVE-2018-8631
Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Dynamics
CVE-2018-8651
Microsoft Dynamics NAV Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability
Microsoft Exchange Server
CVE-2018-8604
Microsoft Exchange Server Tampering Vulnerability
Microsoft Graphics Component
CVE-2018-8595
Windows GDI Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Graphics Component
CVE-2018-8596
Windows GDI Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Graphics Component
CVE-2018-8638
DirectX Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Graphics Component
CVE-2018-8639
Win32k Privilege Escalation Vulnerability
Microsoft Office
CVE-2018-8587
Microsoft Outlook Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Microsoft Office
CVE-2018-8597
Microsoft Excel Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Microsoft Office
CVE-2018-8598
Microsoft Excel Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Office
CVE-2018-8627
Microsoft Excel Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Office
CVE-2018-8628
Microsoft PowerPoint Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Microsoft Office
CVE-2018-8636
Microsoft Excel Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Microsoft Office SharePoint
CVE-2018-8580
Microsoft SharePoint Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Office SharePoint
CVE-2018-8635
Microsoft SharePoint Server Privilege Escalation Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8583
Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8617
Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8618
Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8624
Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8625
Windows VBScript Engine Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8629
Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Scripting Engine
CVE-2018-8643
Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
Microsoft Windows
CVE-2018-8649
Windows Denial-of-Service Vulnerability
Microsoft Windows DNS
CVE-2018-8514
Remote Procedure Call Runtime Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Microsoft Windows DNS
CVE-2018-8626
Windows DNS Server Heap Overflow Vulnerability
Visual Studio
CVE-2018-8599
Diagnostics Hub Standard Collector Service Privilege Escalation Vulnerability
Windows Authentication Methods
CVE-2018-8634
Microsoft Text-To-Speech Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Windows Azure Pack
CVE-2018-8652
Windows Azure Pack Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability
Windows Kernel
CVE-2018-8477
Windows Kernel Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Windows Kernel
CVE-2018-8611
Windows Kernel Privilege Escalation Vulnerability
Windows Kernel
CVE-2018-8612
Connected User Experiences and Telemetry Service Denial-of-Service Vulnerability
Windows Kernel
CVE-2018-8621
Windows Kernel Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Windows Kernel
CVE-2018-8622
Windows Kernel Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Windows Kernel
CVE-2018-8637
Win32k Information Disclosure Vulnerability
Windows Kernel-Mode Drivers
CVE-2018-8641
Win32k Privilege Escalation Vulnerability

Recommended Solutions

Microsofthas released security updates. Please install them as soon as possible.

ADV180031 – December 2018 Adobe Flash Security Update

CVE ID
Vulnerability Description
Maximum Severity Rating
Vulnerability Impact
ADV180031
MITRE
NVD
CVE Title: December 2018 Adobe Flash Security Update
Description: This security update addresses the following vulnerabilities, which are described in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB18-42: CVE-2018-15982 CVE-2018-15983
FAQ:
None
Mitigations:Workarounds: Workaround refers to a setting or configuration change that would help block known attack vectors before you apply the update. Prevent Adobe Flash Player from runningYou can disable attempts to instantiate Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and other applications that honor the kill bit feature, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010, by setting the kill bit for the control in the registry. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. To set the kill bit for the control in the registry, perform the following steps: Paste the following into a text file and save it with the .reg file extension. 2.Windows Registry Editor Version 5.003.[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}]4. "Compatibility Flags"=dword:000004005. 6.[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}]7."Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy. For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. Impact of workaround. There is no impact as long as the object is not intended to be used in Internet Explorer. How to undo the workaround. Delete the registry keys that were added in implementing this workaround. Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer through Group Policy Note The Group Policy MMC snap-in can be used to set policy for a machine, for an organizational unit, or for an entire domain. For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites: Group Policy Overview What is Group Policy Object Editor? Core Group Policy tools and settings To disable Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer through Group Policy, perform the following steps: Note This workaround does not prevent Flash from being invoked from other applications, such as Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2010. Open the Group Policy Management Console and configure the console to work with the appropriate Group Policy object, such as local machine, OU, or domain GPO. Navigate to the following node: Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Internet Explorer -> Security Features -> Add-on Management Double-click Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer technology to instantiate Flash objects. Change the setting to Enabled. Click Apply and then click OK to return to the Group Policy Management Console. Refresh Group Policy on all systems or wait for the next scheduled Group Policy refresh interval for the settings to take effect. Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Office 2010 on affected systems NoteThis workaround does not prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. For detailed steps that you can use to prevent a control from running in Internet Explorer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 240797. Follow the steps in the article to create a Compatibility Flags value in the registry to prevent a COM object from being instantiated in Internet Explorer. To disable Adobe Flash Player in Office 2010 only, set the kill bit for the ActiveX control for Adobe Flash Player in the registry using the following steps: Create a text file named Disable_Flash.reg with the following contents:[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\Common\COM\Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy. For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collectionPrevent ActiveX controls from running in Office 2007 and Office 2010 To disable all ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, including Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then select Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Impact of workaround. Office documents that use embedded ActiveX controls may not display as intended. How to undo the workaround. To re-enable ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then deselect Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to “High” to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting. You can do this by setting your browser security to High. To raise the browsing security level in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click** Internet Option**s. In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Internet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High. This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click Local intranet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High. This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click OK to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to HighNote Setting the level to High may cause some websites to work incorrectly. If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites. This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to blocking ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting. Many websites on the Internet or an intranet use ActiveX or Active Scripting to provide additional functionality. For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX Controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Blocking ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. If you do not want to block ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting for such sites, use the steps outlined in “Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone”. Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu. Click the Security tab. Click Internet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click OK to return to Internet Explorer, and then click OK again. Note Disabling Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zones may cause some websites to work incorrectly. If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites. This will allow the site to work correctly. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to prompting before running Active Scripting. Many websites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use Active Scripting to provide additional functionality. For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use Active Scripting to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround. For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yesto run Active Scripting. If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in “Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone”. Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone. This will allow you to continue to use trusted websites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab. In the Select a web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites. If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this website to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add. Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone. Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your system. Two sites in particular that you may want to add are *.windowsupdate.microsoft.com and *.update.microsoft.com. These are the sites that will host the update, and they require an ActiveX control to install the update.
Revision:
1.0    12/05/2018 08:00:00     Information published.
Critical
Remote Code Execution

Statement

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